18
May
2017
Thursday, May 18, 2017
IFI Staff
Christian business owner sued by LGBT activists wins case

Over the past eight years, Americans saw a large number of Christians and Christian-owned businesses taken to court by various special interest groups and activists. 

From the Klein family in Oregon, who politely declined to bake a cake for a same-sex ceremony, to florist Barronelle Stutzman and Indiana’s own Memories Pizza, business owners were force-fed a new policy by the progressives in power: if you want to run a business, you must be willing to sacrifice what you believe in.

 

Time after time, it seemed, Christians were being forced by courts to violate their convictions. That is, until a victory this week.

 

Blaine Adamson owns Hands On Originals Christian Outfitters, a custom Christian apparel shop in Lexington, Kentucky.  Adamson was sued in 2014 because he declined to make custom t-shirts for the Lexington Pride Festival, citing his personal convictions as his reason for declining the order.

 

While the lawsuit claimed Adamson violated Lexington’s non-discrimination laws, his defense built a compelling case that cited the Constitution’s protections for free speech, and ultimately prevailed in a Kentucky courtroom in 2015.

 

The plaintiffs – funded by the LGBT lobby – appealed the decision, and, this week, they lost again, this time in the Kentucky Court of Appeals.

 

“The right of free speech does not guarantee to any person the right to use someone else’s property,” wrote Judge Joy Kramer in her decision to uphold the 2015 ruling. “The ‘conduct’ Hands On Originals chose not to promote was pure speech.”

 

You can read more about the case and its background here.

 

We’re on the front lines to make sure activist judges in Indiana don’t threaten religious freedom for Christians and Christian business owners. Will you join the fight by making a tax-deductible contribution of $35, $80, $115, or more today? Your dollars will be put to immediate use to make sure religious freedom cannot be abridged in the Hoosier State.

Comments: (0)

0 Comments